‘Covid-19-proof’ Londoner who became ‘Crazy Mary’ has been named as a Londoner to ‘Caveman’

Londoner Alex Kopple has become a “CrazyMary”, a nickname for a London woman who had a severe case of the virus after living with the virus.

Kopple, 25, from Bury St Edmunds, was diagnosed with C. diff infection and had been in remission for several weeks when she had a test result last week which suggested she had become infected with the strain.

She had been staying in a London apartment, where her roommates were ill, and Kopples condition had worsened.

In a tweet posted on Monday, Koppels mother described her daughter as “a crazy woman” who “went through hell”.

Her mother said: “She has the most intense, craziest personality and she has a lot of fear and anxiety.”

Koffle is now a “caveman” living with her mother in a flat in a suburb of London.

Her mum said she had never heard of the nickname before but she is delighted to be the first person to be given the moniker.

“She has become such a character, she has taken over our lives,” she said.

The BBC’s social media editor Matt Parris said the nickname was a way of expressing support for Koppler and her mother.

He said: “Alex has become this crazy woman, she goes through hell, she doesn’t know what to do with herself.”

It’s just a great name for her.

According to the UK Department for Health, C.diff is a very rare type of coronavirus and can only be contracted by close contact with infected people. “

I think it is something that people really need to think about and to know that this is something we can live with,” she added.

According to the UK Department for Health, C.diff is a very rare type of coronavirus and can only be contracted by close contact with infected people.

Symptoms include fever, cough and sore throat.

About 1.3 million people worldwide are thought to have contracted the virus, which was first detected in the US in March.

This is believed to be down to “covid sharing” between people in close contact and those in isolation, although there is no confirmed link to the current outbreak.

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